Home About HyMeX
Motivations
Science questions
Observation strategy
Modelling strategy
Target areas
Key documents
Organisation
International coordination
Working groups
Task teams
National contributions
Endorsements
Resources
Database
Data policy
Publications
Education and summer schools
Drifting balloons (BAMED)
SOP web page
Google maps data visualisation
Workshops Projects
ASICS-MED
MOBICLIMEX
MUSIC
IODA-MED
REMEMBER
FLOODSCALE
EXAEDRE
Offers Links Contacts
Science & Task teams
Science teams
Task teams
Implementation plan
Coordination
International Scientific Steering Committee (ISSC)
Executive Committee for Implementation and Science Coordination (EC-ISC)
Executive Committee - France (EC-Fr)
HyMeX France
HyMeX Italy
HyMeX Spain
Archive
by Adler, B. and Kalthoff, N.
Abstract:
Over complex terrain, convection and thermally-driven circulations simultaneously occur under fair weather conditions during the day. To investigate these processes on the basis of observations, simultaneous measurements on different scales are necessary. Comprehensive measurements with the mobile observation platform KITcube were performed on the mountainous island of Corsica during the HYdrological cycle in Mediterranean EXperiment (HyMeX) field campaign in late summer and autumn 2012. Using a case study, the benefit of integrated measurement systems and coordinated scan strategies was demonstrated, and experimental evidence of, and new insights into, convective and advective transport processes in a valley were obtained. Convection, thermally-driven circulations and topographic and advective venting led to the diurnal cycle of temperature, humidity and wind over complex terrain in the mountain atmospheric boundary layer (mountain ABL), which was deeper than an ABL over homogeneous terrain under equal surface forcing. Due to the combined transport processes on different scales, the mountain ABL in a valley also extended beyond the convection layer, which was characterized by surface-based, buoyancy-driven turbulent mixing. Strong subsidence, with a vertical velocity of about 1 m s −1 , was present within the mountain ABL for several hours around noon and suppressed the convection-layer growth. Above the layer with subsidence, elevated vertical motions, consisting of alternating updrafts and downdrafts, occurred. Once the convection layer grew to the bottom of the layer with elevated vertical motions, surface-based convective cells occasionally coupled to the elevated updrafts, as a result of which the convection layer rapidly deepened.
Reference:
Adler, B. and Kalthoff, N., 2014: Multi-scale transport processes observed in the boundary layer over a mountainous islandBoundary-Layer Meteorology, 153, 515-537.
Bibtex Entry:
@Article{Adler2014b,
  Title                    = {Multi-scale transport processes observed in the boundary layer over a mountainous island},
  Author                   = {Adler, B. and Kalthoff, N.},
  Journal                  = {Boundary-Layer Meteorology},
  Year                     = {2014},

  Month                    = {December},
  Number                   = {3},
  Pages                    = {515-537},
  Volume                   = {153},

  Abstract                 = {Over complex terrain, convection and thermally-driven circulations simultaneously occur under fair weather conditions during the day. To investigate these processes on the basis of observations, simultaneous measurements on different scales are necessary. Comprehensive measurements with the mobile observation platform KITcube were performed on the mountainous island of Corsica during the HYdrological cycle in Mediterranean EXperiment (HyMeX) field campaign in late summer and autumn 2012. Using a case study, the benefit of integrated measurement systems and coordinated scan strategies was demonstrated, and experimental evidence of, and new insights into, convective and advective transport processes in a valley were obtained. Convection, thermally-driven circulations and topographic and advective venting led to the diurnal cycle of temperature, humidity and wind over complex terrain in the mountain atmospheric boundary layer (mountain ABL), which was deeper than an ABL over homogeneous terrain under equal surface forcing. Due to the combined transport processes on different scales, the mountain ABL in a valley also extended beyond the convection layer, which was characterized by surface-based, buoyancy-driven turbulent mixing. Strong subsidence, with a vertical velocity of about 1 m s −1 , was present within the mountain ABL for several hours around noon and suppressed the convection-layer growth. Above the layer with subsidence, elevated vertical motions, consisting of alternating updrafts and downdrafts, occurred. Once the convection layer grew to the bottom of the layer with elevated vertical motions, surface-based convective cells occasionally coupled to the elevated updrafts, as a result of which the convection layer rapidly deepened.},
  Copublication            = {2: 2 De},
  Doi                      = {10.1007/s10546-014-9957-8},
  Keywords                 = {Convection; Corsica; Elevated vertical motions; HyMeX; KITcube; Thermally-driven circulations;},
  Owner                    = {hymexw},
  Timestamp                = {2015.10.05},
  Url                      = {http://rd.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10546-014-9957-8}
}