Home About HyMeX
Motivations
Science questions
Observation strategy
Modelling strategy
Target areas
Key documents
Organisation
International coordination
Working groups
Task teams
National contributions
Endorsements
Resources
Database
Data policy
Publications
Education and summer schools
Drifting balloons (BAMED)
SOP web page
Google maps data visualisation
Workshops Projects
ASICS-MED
MOBICLIMEX
MUSIC
IODA-MED
REMEMBER
FLOODSCALE
EXAEDRE
Offers Links Contacts
Science & Task teams
Science teams
Task teams
Implementation plan
Coordination
International Scientific Steering Committee (ISSC)
Executive Committee for Implementation and Science Coordination (EC-ISC)
Executive Committee - France (EC-Fr)
HyMeX France
HyMeX Italy
HyMeX Spain
Archive
by Borga, M., Stoffel, M., Marchi, L., Marra, F. and Jakob, M.
Abstract:
Summary Flash floods and debris flows develop at space and time scales that conventional observation systems for rainfall, streamflow and sediment discharge are not able to monitor. Consequently, the atmospheric, hydrological and geomorphic controls on these hydrogeomorphic processes are poorly understood, leading to highly uncertain warning and risk management. On the other hand, remote sensing of precipitation and numerical weather predictions have become the basis of several flood forecasting systems, enabling increasingly accurate detection of hazardous events. The objective of this paper is to provide a review on current European and international research on early warning systems for flash floods and debris flows. We expand upon these themes by identifying: (a) the state of the art; (b) knowledge gaps; and (c) suggested research directions to advance warning capabilities for extreme hydrogeomorphic processes. We also suggest three areas in which advancements in science will have immediate and important practical consequence, namely development of rainfall estimation and nowcasting schemes suited to the specific space–time scales, consolidating physical, engineering and social datasets of flash floods and debris-flows, integration of methods for multiple hydrogeomorphic hazard warning.
Reference:
Borga, M., Stoffel, M., Marchi, L., Marra, F. and Jakob, M., 2014: Hydrogeomorphic response to extreme rainfall in headwater systems: flash floods and debris flowsJournal of Hydrology, 518, Part B, 194-205. (Climatic change impact on water: overcoming data and science gaps)
Bibtex Entry:
@Article{Borga2014,
  Title                    = {Hydrogeomorphic response to extreme rainfall in headwater systems: flash floods and debris flows},
  Author                   = {Borga, M. and Stoffel, M. and Marchi, L. and Marra, F. and Jakob, M.},
  Journal                  = {Journal of Hydrology },
  Year                     = {2014},
  Note                     = {Climatic change impact on water: overcoming data and science gaps},
  Pages                    = {194-205},
  Volume                   = {518, Part B},

  Abstract                 = {Summary Flash floods and debris flows develop at space and time scales that conventional observation systems for rainfall, streamflow and sediment discharge are not able to monitor. Consequently, the atmospheric, hydrological and geomorphic controls on these hydrogeomorphic processes are poorly understood, leading to highly uncertain warning and risk management. On the other hand, remote sensing of precipitation and numerical weather predictions have become the basis of several flood forecasting systems, enabling increasingly accurate detection of hazardous events. The objective of this paper is to provide a review on current European and international research on early warning systems for flash floods and debris flows. We expand upon these themes by identifying: (a) the state of the art; (b) knowledge gaps; and (c) suggested research directions to advance warning capabilities for extreme hydrogeomorphic processes. We also suggest three areas in which advancements in science will have immediate and important practical consequence, namely development of rainfall estimation and nowcasting schemes suited to the specific space–time scales, consolidating physical, engineering and social datasets of flash floods and debris-flows, integration of methods for multiple hydrogeomorphic hazard warning.},
  Copublication            = {5: 2 It, 1 Sw, 1 Ca, 1 Is},
  Doi                      = {10.1016/j.jhydrol.2014.05.022},
  ISSN                     = {0022-1694},
  Keywords                 = {Flash flood},
  Owner                    = {hymexw},
  Timestamp                = {2016.01.08},
  Url                      = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022169414003862}
}