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by Doerenbecher, A., Basdevant, C., Drobinski, P., Durand, P., Fesquet, C., Bernard, F., Cocquerez, P., Verdier, N. and Vargas, A.
Abstract:
Low atmosphere, constant volume balloons offer unique observing capabilities, such as Lagrangian sampling of air masses and data collection for weather prediction. These aspects are illustrated through field campaigns using CNES balloons. Balloons are one of the key observing platforms for the atmosphere. Radiosounding is the most commonly used technique and provides over a thousand vertical profiles worldwide every day. These data represent an essential cornerstone of data assimilation for numerical weather prediction systems. Although less common (but equally interesting for the in-situ investigation of the atmosphere), drifting boundary layer pressurized balloons (BLPBs) offer rare observational skills. These balloons collect meteorological and/or chemical measurements at isopycnal height as they drift in a quasi Lagrangian way. The BLPB system presented in this paper was developed by the French space agency (CNES) and has been used in field experiments focusing on precipitation in Africa (AMMA) and the Mediterranean (HyMeX) as well as on air pollution in India (INDOEX) and the Mediterranean (TraQa, ChArMeX). One important advantage of the BLPBs is their capability to explore the lowest layers of the atmosphere above the oceans, areas that remain difficult to access. BLPB had a leading role in a complex adaptive observation system for the forecast of severe precipitation events. These balloons collected data in the marine environment of convective systems, which were assimilated in real time to improve the knowledge of the state of the atmosphere in the numerical prediction models of Météo-France.
Reference:
Doerenbecher, A., Basdevant, C., Drobinski, P., Durand, P., Fesquet, C., Bernard, F., Cocquerez, P., Verdier, N. and Vargas, A., 2016: Low atmosphere drifting balloons: platforms for environment monitoring and forecast improvementBulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 97, 1583-1599.
Bibtex Entry:
@Article{Doerenbecher2016,
  Title                    = {Low atmosphere drifting balloons: platforms for environment monitoring and forecast improvement},
  Author                   = {Doerenbecher, A. and Basdevant, C. and Drobinski, P. and Durand, P. and Fesquet, C. and Bernard, F. and Cocquerez, P. and Verdier, N. and Vargas, A.},
  Journal                  = {Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society},
  Year                     = {2016},

  Month                    = {September},
  Number                   = {9},
  Pages                    = {1583-1599},
  Volume                   = {97},

  Abstract                 = {Low atmosphere, constant volume balloons offer unique observing capabilities, such as Lagrangian sampling of air masses and data collection for weather prediction. These aspects are illustrated through field campaigns using CNES balloons. Balloons are one of the key observing platforms for the atmosphere. Radiosounding is the most commonly used technique and provides over a thousand vertical profiles worldwide every day. These data represent an essential cornerstone of data assimilation for numerical weather prediction systems. Although less common (but equally interesting for the in-situ investigation of the atmosphere), drifting boundary layer pressurized balloons (BLPBs) offer rare observational skills. These balloons collect meteorological and/or chemical measurements at isopycnal height as they drift in a quasi Lagrangian way. The BLPB system presented in this paper was developed by the French space agency (CNES) and has been used in field experiments focusing on precipitation in Africa (AMMA) and the Mediterranean (HyMeX) as well as on air pollution in India (INDOEX) and the Mediterranean (TraQa, ChArMeX). One important advantage of the BLPBs is their capability to explore the lowest layers of the atmosphere above the oceans, areas that remain difficult to access. BLPB had a leading role in a complex adaptive observation system for the forecast of severe precipitation events. These balloons collected data in the marine environment of convective systems, which were assimilated in real time to improve the knowledge of the state of the atmosphere in the numerical prediction models of Météo-France.},
  Copublication            = {9: 9 Fr},
  Doi                      = {10.1175/BAMS-D-14-00182.1},
  Owner                    = {hymexw},
  Timestamp                = {2017.09.11},
  Url                      = {http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/BAMS-D-14-00182.1}
}