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by Gatlin, P.N., Thurai, M., Bringi, V.N., Petersen, W., Wolff, D., Tokay, A., Carey, L. and Wingo, M.
Abstract:
A dataset containing 9,637 hours of two-dimensional video disdrometer observations consisting of more than 240 million raindrops measured at diverse climatological locations was compiled to help characterize underlying drop size distribution (DSD) assumptions essential to make precise retrievals of rainfall using remote-sensing platforms. This study concentrates on the tail of the DSD, which largely impacts rainfall retrieval algorithms that utilize radar reflectivity. The maximum raindrop diameter was a median factor of 1.8 larger than the mass-weighted mean diameter and increased with rainfall rate. Only 0.4% of the 1-minute DSD spectra were found to contain large raindrops exceeding 5 mm in diameter. Large raindrops were most abundant at the tropical locations, especially in Puerto Rico, and were largely concentrated during the spring, especially at sub-tropical locations. Giant raindrops exceeding 8 mm in diameter occurred at tropical, sub-tropical and at high-latitude, continental locations. The greatest number of giant raindrops were found in the sub-tropical locations, with the largest being a 9.7 mm raindrop that occurred in northern Oklahoma during the passage of a hail-producing thunderstorm. These results suggest large raindrops are more likely to fall from clouds that contain hail, especially those raindrops exceeding 8 mm in diameter.
Reference:
Gatlin, P.N., Thurai, M., Bringi, V.N., Petersen, W., Wolff, D., Tokay, A., Carey, L. and Wingo, M., 2015: Searching for large raindrops: a global summary of two-dimensional video disdrometer observationsJournal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 54, 1069-1089.
Bibtex Entry:
@Article{Gatlin2015,
  Title                    = {Searching for large raindrops: a global summary of two-dimensional video disdrometer observations},
  Author                   = {Gatlin, P.N. and Thurai, M. and Bringi, V.N. and Petersen, W. and Wolff, D. and Tokay, A. and Carey, L. and Wingo, M.},
  Journal                  = {Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology},
  Year                     = {2015},

  Month                    = {May},
  Number                   = {5},
  Pages                    = {1069-1089},
  Volume                   = {54},

  Abstract                 = {A dataset containing 9,637 hours of two-dimensional video disdrometer observations consisting of more than 240 million raindrops measured at diverse climatological locations was compiled to help characterize underlying drop size distribution (DSD) assumptions essential to make precise retrievals of rainfall using remote-sensing platforms. This study concentrates on the tail of the DSD, which largely impacts rainfall retrieval algorithms that utilize radar reflectivity. The maximum raindrop diameter was a median factor of 1.8 larger than the mass-weighted mean diameter and increased with rainfall rate. Only 0.4% of the 1-minute DSD spectra were found to contain large raindrops exceeding 5 mm in diameter. Large raindrops were most abundant at the tropical locations, especially in Puerto Rico, and were largely concentrated during the spring, especially at sub-tropical locations. Giant raindrops exceeding 8 mm in diameter occurred at tropical, sub-tropical and at high-latitude, continental locations. The greatest number of giant raindrops were found in the sub-tropical locations, with the largest being a 9.7 mm raindrop that occurred in northern Oklahoma during the passage of a hail-producing thunderstorm. These results suggest large raindrops are more likely to fall from clouds that contain hail, especially those raindrops exceeding 8 mm in diameter.},
  Copublication            = {8: 8 USA},
  Doi                      = {10.1175/JAMC-D-14-0089.1},
  Keywords                 = {hail, rainfall, cloud microphysics, drop size distribution, radars/radar observations, remote sensing},
  Owner                    = {hymexw},
  Timestamp                = {2016.01.08},
  Url                      = {http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/JAMC-D-14-0089.1}
}