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by Molinié, G., Ceresetti, D., Anquetin, S., Creutin, J.-D. and Boudevillain, B.
Abstract:
This paper presents an analysis of the rainfall regime of a Mediterranean mountainous region of southeastern France. The rainfall regime is studied on temporal scales from hourly to yearly using daily and hourly rain gauge data of 43 and 16 years, respectively. The domain is 200 × 200 km2 with spatial resolution of hourly and daily rain gauges of about 8 and 5 km, respectively. On average, yearly rainfall increases from about 0.5 m yr−1 in the large river plain close to the Mediterranean Sea to up to 2 m yr−1 over the surrounding mountain ridges. The seasonal distribution is also uneven: one-third of the cumulative rainfall occurs during the autumn season and one-fourth during the spring. At finer time scales, rainfall is studied in terms of rain–no-rain intermittency and nonzero intensity. The monthly intermittency (proportion of dry days per month) and the daily intermittency (proportion of dry hours per day) is fairly well correlated with the relief. The higher the rain gauges are, the lower the monthly and daily intermittencies are. The hourly and daily rainfall intensities are analyzed in terms of seasonal variability, diurnal cycle, and spatial pattern. The difference between regular and heavy-rainfall event is depicted by using both central parameters and maximum values of intensity distributions. The relationship between rain gauge altitudes and rainfall intensity is grossly inverted relative to intermittency and is also far more complex. The spatial and temporal rainfall patterns depicted from rain gauge data are discussed in the light of known meteorological processes affecting the study region.
Reference:
Molinié, G., Ceresetti, D., Anquetin, S., Creutin, J.-D. and Boudevillain, B., 2012: Rainfall Regime of a Mountainous Mediterranean Region: Statistical Analysis at Short Time StepsJournal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 51, 429-448.
Bibtex Entry:
@Article{Molinie2011,
  Title                    = {Rainfall Regime of a Mountainous Mediterranean Region: Statistical Analysis at Short Time Steps},
  Author                   = {Molinié, G. and Ceresetti, D. and Anquetin, S. and Creutin, J.-D. and Boudevillain, B.},
  Journal                  = {Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology},
  Year                     = {2012},

  Month                    = {March},
  Number                   = {3},
  Pages                    = {429-448},
  Volume                   = {51},

  Abstract                 = {This paper presents an analysis of the rainfall regime of a Mediterranean mountainous region of southeastern France. The rainfall regime is studied on temporal scales from hourly to yearly using daily and hourly rain gauge data of 43 and 16 years, respectively. The domain is 200 × 200 km2 with spatial resolution of hourly and daily rain gauges of about 8 and 5 km, respectively. On average, yearly rainfall increases from about 0.5 m yr−1 in the large river plain close to the Mediterranean Sea to up to 2 m yr−1 over the surrounding mountain ridges. The seasonal distribution is also uneven: one-third of the cumulative rainfall occurs during the autumn season and one-fourth during the spring. At finer time scales, rainfall is studied in terms of rain–no-rain intermittency and nonzero intensity. The monthly intermittency (proportion of dry days per month) and the daily intermittency (proportion of dry hours per day) is fairly well correlated with the relief. The higher the rain gauges are, the lower the monthly and daily intermittencies are. The hourly and daily rainfall intensities are analyzed in terms of seasonal variability, diurnal cycle, and spatial pattern. The difference between regular and heavy-rainfall event is depicted by using both central parameters and maximum values of intensity distributions. The relationship between rain gauge altitudes and rainfall intensity is grossly inverted relative to intermittency and is also far more complex. The spatial and temporal rainfall patterns depicted from rain gauge data are discussed in the light of known meteorological processes affecting the study region.},
  Booktitle                = {Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology},
  Copublication            = {5: 5 Fr},
  Doi                      = {10.1175/2011JAMC2691.1},
  ISSN                     = {1558-8424},
  Owner                    = {hymexw},
  Publisher                = {American Meteorological Society},
  Timestamp                = {2016.01.08},
  Url                      = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/2011JAMC2691.1}
}