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Archive
by Parodi, A., Boni, G., Ferraris, L., Siccardi, F., Pagliara, P., Trovatore, E., Foufoula-Georgiou, E. and Kranzlmueller, D.
Abstract:
The city of Genoa, Italy, nestled between the Tyrrhenian Sea and the Apennine Mountains, was rocked by severe flash foods on 4 November 2011. About 500 millimeters of rain—a third of the average annual rainfall—fell in 6 hours, killing six people and devastating the city center. A storm of this intensity is considered to be a multicentennial-return-period event. The torrential rainfall inflicted the worst disaster Genoa has experienced since October 1970, when a similar event killed 25 people. The peculiar fine-scale properties of this event motivate a comprehensive research effort in the field of predictability of severe rainfall processes over areas of complex orography.
Reference:
Parodi, A., Boni, G., Ferraris, L., Siccardi, F., Pagliara, P., Trovatore, E., Foufoula-Georgiou, E. and Kranzlmueller, D., 2012: The “perfect storm”: From across the Atlantic to the hills of GenoaEos, Transactions American Geophysical Union, 93, 225-226. (ACLN)
Bibtex Entry:
@Article{Parodi2012,
  Title                    = {The “perfect storm”: From across the Atlantic to the hills of Genoa},
  Author                   = {Parodi, A. and Boni, G. and Ferraris, L. and Siccardi, F. and Pagliara, P. and Trovatore, E. and Foufoula-Georgiou, E. and Kranzlmueller, D.},
  Journal                  = {Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union},
  Year                     = {2012},
  Number                   = {24},
  Pages                    = {225-226},
  Volume                   = {93},

  Abstract                 = {The city of Genoa, Italy, nestled between the Tyrrhenian Sea and the Apennine Mountains, was rocked by severe flash foods on 4 November 2011. About 500 millimeters of rain—a third of the average annual rainfall—fell in 6 hours, killing six people and devastating the city center. A storm of this intensity is considered to be a multicentennial-return-period event. The torrential rainfall inflicted the worst disaster Genoa has experienced since October 1970, when a similar event killed 25 people. The peculiar fine-scale properties of this event motivate a comprehensive research effort in the field of predictability of severe rainfall processes over areas of complex orography.},
  Comment                  = {ACLN},
  Copublication            = {8: 6 It, 1 USA, 1 De },
  Doi                      = {10.1029/2012EO240001},
  ISSN                     = {2324-9250},
  Keywords                 = {storm, flash-flood, hydrometeorology},
  Owner                    = {hymexw},
  Timestamp                = {2016.01.07},
  Url                      = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2012EO240001}
}