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Archive
by Röhner, L., Nerding, K.-U. and Corsmeier, U.
Abstract:
The western Mediterranean area is often affected by heavy precipitation events (HPE). To understand these events the research program HyMeX (Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment) was established. We investigated a HyMeX HPE over Spain which took place between 28 and 29 September 2012. Due to extreme local precipitation that occurred over the Spanish Mediterranean coast and amounted to over 200 mm rain in a few hours, this event is not only of scientific interest but also had a large social impact. A detailed process study of the scale dependency of the HPE’s triggering is performed with the NWP model COSMO and the Lagrangian analysis tool LAGRANTO. Large scale lifting is reasonably well captured by global scale models and local scale convection is tackled by convection permitting models. Between these phenomena there is still a scale where uplift takes place and convective clouds can lead to partly severe precipitation. For the investigated case study, mesoscale horizontal moisture convergence and orographic enhancement over land are identified as the two triggering mechanisms leading to severe precipitation. Vertical profiles of equivalent potential temperature are used to explain the evolution of stability at two selected sites over land and sea. Moisture trajectories indicate the pathways of air masses involved in the HPE. On the one hand, the synoptic flow and the mesoscale convergence line are well represented by the trajectories, on the other hand, additional information about moisture sources were found. Two moisture uptake regions could be identified for this convective HPE: the early part of the event was fed from the eastern Atlantic Ocean, the latter part from the Mediterranean Sea itself. Compared to other cases with strong dynamic forcing, this event is mainly governed by regional diabatic processes.
Reference:
Röhner, L., Nerding, K.-U. and Corsmeier, U., 2016: Diagnostic study of a HyMeX heavy precipitation event over Spain by investigation of moisture trajectoriesQuarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 142, 287-297.
Bibtex Entry:
@Article{Röhner2016,
  Title                    = {Diagnostic study of a HyMeX heavy precipitation event over Spain by investigation of moisture trajectories},
  Author                   = {Röhner, L. and Nerding, K.-U. and Corsmeier, U.},
  Journal                  = {Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society},
  Year                     = {2016},

  Month                    = {August},
  Number                   = {S1},
  Pages                    = {287-297},
  Volume                   = {142},

  Abstract                 = {The western Mediterranean area is often affected by heavy precipitation events (HPE). To understand these events the research program HyMeX (Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment) was established. We investigated a HyMeX HPE over Spain which took place between 28 and 29 September 2012. Due to extreme local precipitation that occurred over the Spanish Mediterranean coast and amounted to over 200 mm rain in a few hours, this event is not only of scientific interest but also had a large social impact. A detailed process study of the scale dependency of the HPE’s triggering is performed with the NWP model COSMO and the Lagrangian analysis tool LAGRANTO. Large scale lifting is reasonably well captured by global scale models and local scale convection is tackled by convection permitting models. Between these phenomena there is still a scale where uplift takes place and convective clouds can lead to partly severe precipitation. For the investigated case study, mesoscale horizontal moisture convergence and orographic enhancement over land are identified as the two triggering mechanisms leading to severe precipitation. Vertical profiles of equivalent potential temperature are used to explain the evolution of stability at two selected sites over land and sea. Moisture trajectories indicate the pathways of air masses involved in the HPE. On the one hand, the synoptic flow and the mesoscale convergence line are well represented by the trajectories, on the other hand, additional information about moisture sources were found. Two moisture uptake regions could be identified for this convective HPE: the early part of the event was fed from the eastern Atlantic Ocean, the latter part from the Mediterranean Sea itself. Compared to other cases with strong dynamic forcing, this event is mainly governed by regional diabatic processes.},
  Copublication            = {3: 3 De},
  Doi                      = {10.1002/qj.2825},
  ISSN                     = {1477-870X},
  Keywords                 = {Mediterranean, heavy precipitation event, HyMeX, moisture trajectories},
  Owner                    = {hymexw},
  Publisher                = {John Wiley \& Sons, Ltd},
  Timestamp                = {2016.08.26},
  Url                      = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/qj.2825}
}