Home About HyMeX
Motivations
Science questions
Observation strategy
Modelling strategy
Target areas
Key documents
Organisation
International coordination
Working groups
Task teams
National contributions
Endorsements
Resources
Database
Data policy
Publications
Education and summer schools
Drifting balloons (BAMED)
SOP web page
Google maps data visualisation
Workshops Projects
ASICS-MED
MOBICLIMEX
MUSIC
IODA-MED
REMEMBER
FLOODSCALE
EXAEDRE
Offers Links Contacts
Science & Task teams
Science teams
Task teams
Implementation plan
Coordination
International Scientific Steering Committee (ISSC)
Executive Committee for Implementation and Science Coordination (EC-ISC)
Executive Committee - France (EC-Fr)
HyMeX France
HyMeX Italy
HyMeX Spain
Archive
by Rysman, J.-F., Lemaître, Y. and Moreau, E.
Abstract:
This study describes the main patterns of rainfall distribution in the Alps–Mediterranean “Euroregion” using a ground radar and characterizes the associated processes using model output. The radar dataset spans 2009–12 with fine spatial (1 km) and temporal (5 min) resolutions. The most significant rain accumulations were observed in 2009 and 2010, and the most intense extreme events occurred in 2010. Conversely, 2012 was a dry year. Model output revealed that the wind shear, the pressure, and the meridional wind at low level were the three main factors explaining the rainfall variability between 2009 and 2012. At the monthly scale, the maximum of rain accumulation was observed in November along the coast. Results also showed that the most intense rain rates were observed during early summer and autumn in the “Pre-Alps.” The monthly variability was characterized by a displacement of extreme rain events from land to sea from late spring to winter. Correlation analyses showed that this displacement was essentially controlled by the convective available potential energy (CAPE). Rainfall showed a diurnal variability from April to August for the land areas of the Alps–Mediterranean Euroregion. The diurnal variability was significant during the spring and summer months, with maximal rain intensity between 1600 and 1800 UTC. The correlation of the rainfall with CAPE showed that this cycle was related to atmospheric instability. A secondary peak in average rain rate was observed during the early morning and was likely triggered by land breezes. The results highlighted that rainfall characteristics are extremely diverse in terms of intensity and distribution in this relatively small region.
Reference:
Rysman, J.-F., Lemaître, Y. and Moreau, E., 2016: Spatial and temporal variability of rainfall in the Alps–Mediterranean EuroregionJournal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 55, 655-671.
Bibtex Entry:
@Article{Rysman2016a,
  Title                    = {Spatial and temporal variability of rainfall in the Alps–Mediterranean Euroregion},
  Author                   = {Rysman, J.-F. and Lemaître, Y. and Moreau, E.},
  Journal                  = {Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology},
  Year                     = {2016},
  Number                   = {3},
  Pages                    = {655-671},
  Volume                   = {55},

  Abstract                 = {This study describes the main patterns of rainfall distribution in the Alps–Mediterranean “Euroregion” using a ground radar and characterizes the associated processes using model output. The radar dataset spans 2009–12 with fine spatial (1 km) and temporal (5 min) resolutions. The most significant rain accumulations were observed in 2009 and 2010, and the most intense extreme events occurred in 2010. Conversely, 2012 was a dry year. Model output revealed that the wind shear, the pressure, and the meridional wind at low level were the three main factors explaining the rainfall variability between 2009 and 2012. At the monthly scale, the maximum of rain accumulation was observed in November along the coast. Results also showed that the most intense rain rates were observed during early summer and autumn in the “Pre-Alps.” The monthly variability was characterized by a displacement of extreme rain events from land to sea from late spring to winter. Correlation analyses showed that this displacement was essentially controlled by the convective available potential energy (CAPE). Rainfall showed a diurnal variability from April to August for the land areas of the Alps–Mediterranean Euroregion. The diurnal variability was significant during the spring and summer months, with maximal rain intensity between 1600 and 1800 UTC. The correlation of the rainfall with CAPE showed that this cycle was related to atmospheric instability. A secondary peak in average rain rate was observed during the early morning and was likely triggered by land breezes. The results highlighted that rainfall characteristics are extremely diverse in terms of intensity and distribution in this relatively small region.},
  Copublication            = {3: 3 Fr},
  Doi                      = {10.1175/JAMC-D-15-0095.1},
  Eprint                   = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/JAMC-D-15-0095.1
},
  Keywords                 = {Complex terrain; Precipitation; Radars/Radar observations; Intraseasonal variability; Seasonal variability;},
  Owner                    = {hymexw},
  Timestamp                = {2016.04.04},
  Url                      = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/JAMC-D-15-0095.1}
}